COCOA SUSTAINABILITY PARTNERSHIP

CSP Annual Report 2019

This year, the support from cocoa stakeholders to CSP has experienced an encouraging increase through direct and indirect contributions to the development of sustainable cocoa in Indonesia. CSP members are satisfied and granted their trust to the CSP Secretariat to manage data governance regarding the achievement of key performance indicators; and stronger coordination and involvement in every activity in promoting and directing examples of smart practices for sustainable cocoa development in Indonesia. The central government also expressed their interest to collaborate in achieving goals and share experiences in applying fertilizer and planting material initiatives so far. Existing donors are also interested in partnering and providing their support during this reporting period. All the indicators above show that the Indonesian cocoa sector is still promising and must be developed for further growth, more concrete, more measurable, more responsible, and more collaborative ideas and initiatives for implementation. Thank you to our Supervisory Board members, Chandra Panjiwibowo (Chairperson of the Supervisory Board), and Fay Fay Choo (Treasurer) and other members who always provide constructive support and criticisms. Thanks to our donors (Rainforest Alliance, RIKOLTO, Yayasan Inisiatif Dagang Hijau, SCPP-Swisscontact, and the Directorate of Perennial Crops and Beverages, Directorate General of Estate Crops, Ministry of Agriculture of the Republic of Indonesia) and new members of CSP (PT. Pupuk Kalimantan Timur and TMCI-ECOM Trading).

CSP Annual Report 2019

CSP Annual Report 2018

AS one of significant decisions which was taken by the members of Cocoa Sustainability Partnership (CSP) in 2018 was to relocate the secretariat of CSP from Makassar to Jakarta. It was hoped that this national cocoa platform could perform and establish greater mutual cooperation with the stakeholders in cocoa sector, particularly the national government, in term of the harmonization of cocoa sustainability development initiatives. And, during the similar year, the fruitful result had been shown. It had been proven that CSP with the national government showed high commitments in order to prioritize the improvement of cocoa farmers resilience by providing decent and affordable accesses to subsidized specific cocoa fertilizers, qualified and certified cocoa planting materials, and financial accesses in supporting the previous programs.

CSP Annual Report 2018

CSP Annual Report 2017

CSP Annual Report 2017

CSP Annual Report 2016

CSP Annual Report 2016

CSP Executive Report 2016

CSP Executive Report 2016

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 19/January - December 2020

The impact of this Covid-19 pandemic also had created massive restriction in most of social life activities. And the impact, as well, is not also at health sector, but also influences the economic sector. Including the efforts of sustainable cocoa development sector in Indonesia. This massive social restriction also hugely impacts the smallholders cocoa farmers in the national cocoa production centers. In relation to this issue, in order to provide continuous supports to the cocoa farmer in enabling them to be productive safely, Cocoa Sustainability Partnership with its members and other sustainable cocoa stakeholders in Indonesia are initiating some support programs. The aid and response gathering are initiated and positively responded. Various products of health sanitation and food materials are distributed evenly to the smallholders cocoa farmers in Indonesia. It is expected that this aid is form of real supports to the cocoa farmers by providing motivation and encourage them in supporting the national economic condition. These smallholders cocoa farmer and its communities keep the economic activities are running well, and in ensuring that the value chain cycle of upstream to downstream cocoa sector is performing positively in a time of pandemic. We are affording, of course, to grow hopes and spirits in a condition that this Covid-19 had impacted our life. And Cocoa Sustainability Partnership with its members and other sustainable cocoa stakeholders in Indonesia will not stop its efforts in providing supports to the smallholders cocoa farmers and its communities.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 19/January - December 2020

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 18/January - April 2019

Since the establishment of Sustainability Partnership (CSP), the members and other cocoa stakeholders had delivered the voice of cocoa farmers in the national cocoa production center areas for a hope on the needs of a fertilizer formula which was specified for cocoa commodity. Since then, CSP and its members had afforded to gather the experience, best practices, studies, researches, and initiatives that had been implemented through joint application with the farmers in finding an alternative to restore the nutrient in soil and plants. With the Agro Input and Planting Materials Task Force, the members of CSP started to gather and review the previous experience which had been implemented in the field. And its result was fruitful. During the Cocoa Sustainability Partnership General Assembly Meeting on August 09, 2017, the resulted document, as entitled as Fertilizer Nutrient Ratio for Nutrient Replenishment: Guidelines and Principles for the Choice of Appropriate Fertilizer for Cocoa, was presented. And in order to finalize this significant finding, the cocoa experts and soil scientists were asked to participate in providing scientific and experience-based reviews regarding the formula of nutrient replenishment. But, the hardwork of Cocoa Sustainability Partnership and its members with other cocoa stakeholders in the development of sustainable cocoa sector in Indonesia was not quited. The next question that should be answered was how this cocoa specific fertilizer could be produced and accessed by the farmers in Indonesia. By referring the previous experience that only the fertilizer for food commodities which were facilitated by the government in term of its distribution and allocated subsidiary budget.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 18/January - April 2019

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 17/September - December 2018

Pengembangan sektor kakao berkelanjutan di Indonesia adalah upaya bersama yang dikoordinasikan oleh para pemangku kepentingan melalui Cocoa Sustainability Partnership. Sepanjang tahun 2018 ini, telah banyak pencapaian yang dilakukan untuk diarahkan pada pengembangan sektor kakao berkelanjutan di tanah air. Upaya tersebut diterapkan agar tingkat kesejahteraan petani kakao dan masyarakatnya bisa ditingkatkan dengan cara perbaikan mutu biji kakao dan peningkatan produktivitas tanaman kakao. Koordinasi dan komunikasi yang dibangun para anggota Cocoa Sustainability Partnership pun terus menerus dikembangkan melalui pertemuan-pertemuan yang melibatkan semua pemangku kepentingan di sektor kakao berkelanjutan di Indonesia. Sinergi dengan pemerintah, baik pemerintah nasional dan daerah, juga ditingkatkan sesuai dengan mandat platform nasional untuk kakao berkelanjutan ini. Sebuah upaya yang tentu saja tidak mudah. Namun dengan dukungan dari para anggotanya, Cocoa Sustainability Partnership pun mampu mengupayakan arah perubahan tersebut. Dalam mewujudkan arah pengembangan sektor kakao yang berkelanjutan di Indonesia, Cocoa Sustainability membuka diri untuk melakukan koordinasi dan komunikasi dengan berbagai pemangku kepentingan di sektor ini. Dan semua upaya bersama yang diterapkan dan dikoordinasikan tersebut akan bermuara pada peningkatan kesejahteran petani kakao dan masyarakatnya.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 17/September - December 2018

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 16/May - August 2018

Fermented cocoa had been initiated since long time ago, and it had been a mandatory for Indonesian cocoa sector. The Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture had declared a Minister Decree No. 67/Permentan/OT.140/5/2014 on the Requirements of Cocoa Bean Quality and Marketing. The decree itself, since the declaration in May 21, 2014, will be effectively implemented in 2016. In the decree, the government applies the National Standard of cocoa bean and in fulfilling the standard, the farmers' cocoa commodity must be fermented. The cocoa beans that will be marketed must fulfill the quality standards proofed by a letter of cocoa bean origin (Surat Keterangan Asal Lokasi-Biji Kakao/SKAL-BK) and certification of farming quality quarantine (Sertifikat Jaminan Mutu Pangan Hasil Pertanian/SJM-BK). But in trial period, the Minister Decree must be postponed for uncertain time. Various opinions had been raised and became a topic discussion for the cocoa stakeholders. And out of the debates, a district in Bali Province, provide different point of view on how a cooperative that works with cocoa farmers in producing fermented cocoa beans. And it has been approved that it can be delivered. The smallholder cocoa farmer in Jembrana District also had approved that fermented cocoa is can be created and more feasible market place.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 16/May - August 2018

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 15/January - April 2018

One of the experienced problems of cocoa farmers in Indonesia is gap of knowledge. And in reducing the gap, Cocoa Sustainability Partnership with its members gathers the coordination and cooperation with the Agriculture Training Center, Agricultural Extension and Human Resources Development Bureau, Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture to create national guidelines and document in form of National Curriculum and Training Modules for Sustainable Cocoa Cultivation and Post Harvest. This curriculum and training modules will be referred as main references source to the government, private, and freelance extension workers in providing facilitation to the farmers in the field. Another problem as main obstacle in increasing the cocoa productivity is the availability and access of cocoa-specific fertilizer. And the members of Cocoa Sustainability Partnership which join the Agro Input and Planting Material Task Force issue a recommendation of fertilizer nutrient ratio for restoring the nutrient. This recommendation will be applied by the cocoa farmer facilitators as guideline and principle in choosing appropriate fertilizer for cocoa.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 15/January - April 2018

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 14/September - December 2017

Almost in every country which its people dominantly work in farming and plantation sectors, the phenomenon is that the number of farming workers is getting low, particularly young generation. Similarly to Indonesia. In the centers of farming activities, the number of youth in participating the sector is getting decrease. With all stakeholders, Cocoa Sustainability Partnership responses this issue. The actors in cocoa farming sector try to attract the interest of youth to be actively engaged in this sector. One of the efforts is to gather the youths from various regions in Indonesia in form of workshop. The government is also engaged. At least to provide general insights in how government efforts in attracting the interests and focuses of youth to farming and plantation sectors. In this edition, COKELAT also gathers some good practices which are implemented by the community in revitalizing the Indonesian sustainable cocoa glories. One of the efforts is to create rooms form collective learning and experience sharing. This effort is established with the construction of cocoa village, or chocolate village.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 14/September - December 2017

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 13/September - December 2016

One of the obstacles which is experienced by smallholder cocoa farmer in Indonesia is the availability of qualified and certified planting materials. The roles of stakeholders in cocoa sector are highly significant in supporting this issues. Accordingly to its function, Cocoa Sustainability Partnership as public-private partnership gathers all stakeholders to be actively engaged in the advancement of sustainable cocoa development in Indonesia. Some periods before, the Indonesian Ministry of Agriculture, Indonesian Cocoa Board, and Cocoa Sustainability Partnership conduct national workshop and seminar in discussing the sustainable management of soil fertility and fertilizer for cocoa in Indonesia. In the presentations, the experts and decision makers combine the on-field experience and try to elaborate the problems of soil fertility and fertilizer accesses for cocoa farmers in Indonesia. Some resource persons also share their studies in this edition.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 13/September - December 2016

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 12/January - May 2016

As the collective objectives of the stakeholders in cocoa sector, Cocoa Sustainability Partnership plays important roles in gathering and consolidating coordination and communication in all streams to establish sustainable cocoa in Indonesia. The objectives are generally generated into some activities with direct impacts from upstream to downstream, from the policy making to forum of smallholder cocoa farmers in some provinces of Indonesia. Furthermore, in order to deliver us to this condition of sustainable cocoa sector in Indonesia, and in order to provide general insights, this current edition of COKELAT will elaborate these issues into three main parts. In the beginning edition of this year, all cocoa sector stakeholders are asked with some questions on what the sustainable farming is, sustainable production, for Indonesia cocoa sector. And the further editions, it will present the parts in establishing the sustainability issues itself.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 12/January - May 2016

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 11/May - August 2015

There are lots of efforts from the organizations and institutions in improving the people and farmers accesses to financial resources. The government itself, in 2007, starts to provide credit guaranteeing for small, medium, and cooperatives unit business through People Business Credit (Kredit Usaha Rakyat/KUR). This scheme provides credit through PT. Askrindo and Perum Jamkrindo with six implementing banking institutions such as BRI, Mandiri, BNI, BTN, Syariah Mandiri, and Bukopin. The empowerment of small, medium, and cooperatives unit business is highly important in opening new employment opportunities and improving the people welfare. Aside of KUR, the government also develops policy packages to improve the real sector in supporting the UMKMK. This policy supports and improves the performance abilities of UMKMK.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 11/May - August 2015

COKELAT Magazine: Vol 10/January - April 2015

The studies in producing cacao clones with high production and pest/disease persistence need abundance of time, seriousness, and diligent; even in Indonesian Coffee and Cocoa Research Institute, as described in the article of page 10. It needs approximately one decade in producing one cacao clone. These superior clones are the findings of breeding experts which is performed routinely and continuously from one genetic material, even by the research institutions or farmers itself. They try to create a planting material with high productivity, at least two tons per year, and persistence to some pests and diseases.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol 10/January - April 2015

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 09/August - December 2014

In its origin habitat in the forest of Amazon, cacao is growing under the shade of other plants, dark and dense; and the cacao is slowly growing and only small amount of fruits. The needs of nutrient, furthermore, is less because those nutrients are spread above the forest floor. Similarly to human beings, the nutrients are generated by cacao in supporting its grows and bear the fruits. The nutrients can be allocated from leaves in form of compost, or directly absorbed from the soil. But when the plants is cultivated in the plantation, cacao is expected to grow faster with many fruits. It needs to apply specific treatments in achieving those expectations. In modern cacao cultivation, the fertilizing is aimed to assist the grows and in order to gain high productivity continuously. Moreover, any farmers who grow the plants, must posses well-maintained knowledge on significant factors in the cacao growing and productivity. The understanding is implemented in the continuous practices on farming management. All elements in the plantation are highly connected to nutrients. Such as the most significant in choosing the planting materials. It affects the resources of harvesting, growing, and needed nutrients. The practices of nursing and choosing the shading plants also affect the quality of seedlings, the plant growth, and distribution of nutrients. The control of pest and diseases will assist the competition in gaining the nutrients. In meanwhile, the density of plants influences the distribution of nutrients, and it will affect the production and growth rate. In this current edition, the technique of cultivating and some suggestion in applying the fertilizing will be elaborated in detail, and provides understanding that the agronomy factors, nutrients, and cacao growth is highly connected. We hope that this edition will provide insights to the farmers and extension workers in ensuring that the best planting practices to gain best production, and the most important is to use less chemical fertilizers. Happy reading!

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 09/August - December 2014

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 08/March - May 2014

As one of the Indonesian commodities, cocoa has a strategic role in the economy of Indonesia, it ranked the third as foreign exchange earner in the state crop sector. In 2012, cocoa has contributed income of USD1,053,446,947 from cocoa beans export and processed cocoa products*. Some government policies in promoting downstream industries in the country bring proven results in the development of Indonesian cocoa industry. One of them is the Indonesian National Standard (SNI) in order to maintain the outstanding quality of cocoa powder in the country. Downstream industry program initiated by the Ministry of Industry was also able to raise the national cocoa industry that can compete, both in domestic and global markets, as well as contribute in supporting the economic growth of our country. Currently, the global cocoa demand growth is of around four million tons per year. Data from the International Cocoa Organization (ICCO) stated that in the last five years, demand for cocoa grown an average of 5% per year. In the future, cocoa has a great power to be developed. It is estimated, the consumption of cocoa in Indonesia, India, and China will reach 1 kg / capita / year so that there will be an additional demand of about 2,2 million tons of cocoa beans per year. In this edition, we will be presenting regions that are in development to become major producer of cocoa and policies that they have to make to meet future demand. You can also see small industries flourished and many foreign investors started to build new factories in Indonesia. Sustainable production and productivity increase programs can also found in this issue. We all hope that, with the participation of government, Indonesia will be the largest cocoa producer as well as the number one chocolate consumer in the world. Happy reading!

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 08/March - May 2014

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 07/December - February 2014

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 07/December - February 2014

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 06/October - December 2013

One of the most important natural resources that cover much of the earth’s surface is soil. Most life on earth depends upon the soil as a direct or indirect source of food. Plants are rooted in the soil and obtain nutrients from it. Animals also get nutrients from eating the plants on the soil. Soil is home of many organisms such as seeds, spores, insects, and worms. The contents of soil change constantly and there are many different kinds of soil. It forms very slowly and is destroyed easily, so it must be conserved in order to continue to support life. Our soil resource can be compared to a bank where continued withdrawal without repayment cannot continue indefinitely. As nutrients are removed by one crop and not replaced for subsequent crop production, yields will decrease accordingly. Accurate accounting of nutrient removal and replacement, crop production statistics, and soil analysis results will help the producer manage fertilizer applications. To grow good crops, most farmers need to fertilize the soil. Fertilizing increases crop yield, and the improved crop growth maintains and even builds soil structure and the quality of the soil. If things aren’t done properly, however, there can be negative impacts. We will show you, how important it is to restore nutrients to the soil; how to do it and how to maintain it so that no more land is damaged.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 06/October - December 2013

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 05/July - September 2013

A Clearer Picture of the Changes In recent years, consumer awareness of certified food products becomes more widely. People are no longer look only at the packaging of the goods, or flavours offered, but rather on how a product is made, do farmers use organic materials to fertilize the soil, and are the manufacturers employed minor workers. People become more and more critical, they are no longer just advanced the economic aspects, but also social and environmental. Indonesia as the third largest cocoa supplier in the world, is seeing the fact as a golden opportunity to improve the quality of cocoa they produced. In 2009, stakeholders such as the government, certification agencies, and chocolate manufacturers managed to formulate a standard that guides farmers for better practices and let them to pay attention to biodiversity as well as cultural aspects of their native lands. Standard called the National Indicators for Cocoa Sustainability is then applied in the form of sustainable certified farmers. We would like to give a clearer picture of the changes that took place since the exercise of certification, especially in the largest cocoa producer centres in Indonesia. We also describe the results obtained by the farmers through certification, their inputs for the stakeholders, as well as other findings obtained by several supply chain managers in the area. We also covered a woman activity as an example to the other farmers who are determined to increase their incomes. This issue is also the first anniversary edition for Cokelat, which carrying some changes in terms of design and content. We will show you a simpler design without having to reduce the weight of the magazine, while the contents lift more about the concerns and grievances of farmers, which we believe it can show us what is actually needed by the farmers and help all parties to improve practices that already exist. Without further delays, please do open the next page and happy reading.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 05/July - September 2013

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 04/March - May 2013

Encouraging farmers to be innovative and creative farmer Encouraging farmers to be an innovative and creative farmer New year, usually came with a determination to try something new and better than the previous year. As in this edition of Cokelat, we bring about the spirit of revitalization by presenting articles that we hope can inspire readers to try out new things. We captured the enthusiasm of farmers in Flores while facing various problems in cocoa production and marketing of their product within a hostile nature and minimum facilities. These experiences we put in two feature stories on cultural influences and profiles of two cooperatives. Encouraging farmers to be an innovative and creative farmer is essential to reduce the vulnerability of farmers to the risk of farming failure, especially with the current climate change. The use of organic materials and utilizing agricultural wastes could be an alternative solution. Two researchers involved in two ACIAR research projects presented tips to encourage farmer innovation and how to revitalize land using organic fertilizers. Furthermore, the model developed by IFC on agrifinancing can be an example to address the farmer’s problems in accessing finance.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 04/March - May 2013

COKEELAT Magazine: Vol. 03/December - February 2013

2012 is an amazing year! We started publishing Cokelat this year feeling somewhat frustrated, but definitely determined. Determined enough to make things happen. One of our primary goals was to find better ways to help cocoa sector actors, especially cocoa farmers in cocoa sustainability efforts. To publish better content, in more formats, that would make a real difference. And to reach more readers with it. We have been trying to have the latest information for our all readers. In this edition, we try to cover some stuff of post harvesting, the time to pay all efforts in cultivating cocoa the time to celebrate. As the last edition in 2012, we also have some words for you. You all play a big part in making things happen - Thank you! Thank you for your comments, which often helped us come up with new topics to write about. Thank you for the links, and for telling others about Cokelat. Thank you for being here, reading along and working alongside us as we all worked towards our goals. We have a great feeling about 2013 and are super excited about going into this New Year together. Let’s celebrate the opportunities which are coming in 2013 and move forward for a better year.

COKEELAT Magazine: Vol. 03/December - February 2013

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 02/July - September 2012

THE IMPROVEMENT of sustainable cocoa production and productivity in Indonesia is the main objective of all performed efforts by the stakeholders in cocoa sector. This objective is aimed as a tool in improving the welfare of cocoa farmers all over the archipelago. It is a significant effort, by referring that most of cocoa cultivation activities in Indonesia are conducted by the smallholder farmers. It is not surprising if the cocoa cultivation is always related and referred as smallholder farming.

COKELAT Magazine: Vol. 02/July - September 2012

STAKEHOLDER INFORMATION

National Curriculum and Training Module for Sustainable Cocoa Cultivation and Post-Harvest

Indonesian

National Curriculum and Training Module for Sustainable Cocoa Cultivation and Post-Harvest

The 2020 Roadmap to Sustainable Indonesian Cocoa

English

The 2020 Roadmap to Sustainable Indonesian Cocoa

General Principles of Good Agriculture Practices for Sustainable Indonesian Cocoa

Indonesian

General Principles of Good Agriculture Practices for Sustainable Indonesian Cocoa

Popular Cocoa Clones Distribution in Indonesia

English

Popular Cocoa Clones Distribution in Indonesia

General Distribution of Cocoa Clones in Indonesia

English

General Distribution of Cocoa Clones in Indonesia

Cacao Seed Sources in Indonesia: Entres Garden

Indonesian

Cacao Seed Sources in Indonesia: Entres Garden

Cacao Seed Sources in Indonesia: Seed Garden

Indonesian

Cacao Seed Sources in Indonesia: Seed Garden
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